The numbers 21 – 100 in German

Congratulations! The fact that you are reading this article tells me that you already know the numbers from 1 – 20 in German, so good on you! Congrats!

As you probably know by now, counting in German is actually not that difficult – especially not for English speakers.

Recap: Numbers 13 – 20

Remember, for the numbers 13-20 the structure was exactly the same in both German and English. In English they are formed by using the term for the second digit (e.g. ‘six’ in 16) and then adding the suffix -teen, which means ten.

And in German it’s basically the same thing. We use the German term for the second digit (e.g. ‘sechs’ in 16) and then we add the suffix -zehn, which means ten. Accordingly, the German term for 16 is sechzehn, for 18 is achtzehn, and so on.

The Numbers 21 – 100

So far with the similarities. Once we reach twenty, however, the English structure changes, while in German it stays almost the same.

In English, we start with the value of the first digit (e.g. ‘twenty’ in 21) and we add the value of the second digit (e.g. ‘one’ in 21),

In German, however, we stay with almost the same structure as we used in the numbers 13 to 20. We start with the value of the second digit (e.g. ‘ein(s)’ in 21), then we add an ‘und’, which means ‘and’, and then we add the value of the first digit (e.g. ‘zwanzig’ in 21).

Accordingly the numbers 21 – 30 are the following:

NumberEnglishGerman
21twenty-oneeinundzwanzig
22twenty-twozweiundzwanzig
23twenty-threedreiundzwanzig
24twenty-fourvierundzwanzig
25twenty-fivefünfundzwanzig
26twenty-sixsechsundzwanzig
27twenty-sevensiebenundzwanzig
28twenty-eightachtundzwanzig
29twenty-nineneunundzwanzig
30thirtydreißig

Accordingly, we move on with the numbers from 31 – 100. We always use the value of the second digit (e.g. ‘vier’ in 34), then we add an ‘und’, which means ‘and’, and then we add the value of the first digit (e.g. ‘dreißig’ in 34). Actually not that difficult, right?

But in order to be able to use this structure, we first need to know the multiples of ten in German. They are:

NumberEnglishGerman
10tenzehn
20twentyzwanzig
30thirtydreißig
40fourtyvierzig
50fiftyfünfzig
60sixtysechzig
70seventysiebzig
80eightyachtzig
90ninetyneunzig
100(one) hundread(ein)hundert
Multiples of ten

Bringing it all together

So with all of that in mind, let’s now take a look at some examples.

Remember2nd digit + “und” + 1st digit

Example numberEnglishGerman
54fifty-fourvierundfünfzig
76seventy-sixsechsundsiebzig
99ninty-nineneunundneunzig
31thirty-oneeinundreißig
64sixty-fourvierundsechzig
82eighty-twozweiundachtzig

Stay tuned for more articles about the German numbers and other essentials for learning German!

The numbers 1 to 20 | The numbers 21 -100 | The numbers 101 – 1000 | The numbers 1000 and beyond

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